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Climb aboard the 540-foot TS Kennedy for Sea Term 2020!  Thanks to cadet blogs, the Captain’s Log, photographs, videos, special features, and a unique hands-on curriculum, you will virtually travel with six-hundred cadets.  Each day, you’ll read about and watch the shipboard responsibilities of cadets majoring in Marine Engineering, Marine Transportation, and Facilities Engineering as they tackle challenging topics such as weather forecasting, celestial navigation, ocean currents, rust removal, engine maintenance, sewerage treatment, firefighting, and seawater desalination. You’ll feel like you’re right beside the cadets as the ship conducts anchoring drills off the coast of Mayaguez, Puerto Rico.  Also aboard the TS Kennedy in 2020 will be cadets majoring in International Maritime Business and cadets majoring in Marine Safety & Environmental Protection.  We’ll keep you updated on what is happening with them as well.  You’ll also experience the food, culture, and attractions of the ship’s four exciting ports of call: Balboa, Panama, Golfito, Costa Rica, Willemstad, Curacao, and Tampa, Florida.

This non-stop adventure begins on Monday, January 6th when cadets board the TS Kennedy.  The ship departs Buzzards Bay on Saturday, January 11th.  The TS Kennedy is scheduled to return on Sunday, February 23rd.  There will be posts each day – even on weekends. 

This year, the Follow The Voyage – Share The Experience Programs will be partnering with Plimouth Plantation and Plymouth 400.  Throughout Sea Term 2020, we’ll be comparing the Mayflower’s historic voyage in 2020 with the voyage of the TS Kennedy in 2020.

Thanks for being a part of Massachusetts Maritime Academy’s free, one-of-a-kind, K-12, STEM adventure on land and sea!

“…I believe I've missed each and every face, Come on and play my music, Let's turn on the love light in the place It's time I found myself, Totally surrounded in your circles Whoa, my friends, Please, celebrate me home, Give me a number, Please, celebrate me home, Play me one more song, That I'll always remember, And I can recall, Whenever I find myself too all alone, I can sing me home…”   Before you view these final photos from Sea Term 2020, please click on Celebrate Me Home by Kenny Loggins. Sea Term 2020 is in the books!  Here are photos of the TS Kennedy’s return to Buzzards Bay at 0930 on Sunday, February 23rd.  I took the photos of the ship passing…
Thanks for taking us on Sea Term 2020 with you, Jack! Your detailed posts were enjoyed and appreciated by thousands and thousands of followers from 5 to 95!    “The Lights All Went Down in Massachusetts” In the midst of the morning Bridge Watch on Friday, the TS Kennedy had begun to sail to the East of Long Island after passing by New Jersey in the night. Now inching ever closer towards Cape Cod, the ship made way to the West of George’s Bank. Smaller vessels could be observed fishing along the edge of the undersea continental shelf (places where depth suddenly changes from shallow to deep tend to be more ideal locations for ground fishing). Captain Campbell paid a visit to the…
The Trash Compactor Watch Caution! Non-Compactible Items Such As Lumber, Cement Products, Pipe, Etc., Should NOT Be Placed in the Trashpacker as These Items May Cause Structural Damage. This is the warning sign attached to the stainless-steel compactor in the Trash Compactor Room located next to dry storage (near the Machine Shop). Just like Deck Watch, this utility watch lasts between 0730-1130, 1650-1730, (Dinner Relief), and 1930-2330. On this day, 3/C Ben Temple (MENG) and 4/C Gamboa-Sanchez (FENG from Kansas) were assigned to operating the compactor whenever cadets arrive with bagged trash that needs to be compressed. Used cardboard is brought here as well, and needs to be flattened…
  Thank you for sharing Sea Term 2020 with all of us, Heather! The End to an Incredible Journey “But you here—you all had something out of life: money, love—whatever one gets on shore—and tell me, wasn’t that the best time, that time when we were young at sea; young and had nothing, on the sea that gives nothing, except hard knocks—and sometimes the chance to feel your strength?” -Joseph Conrad  Youth To preface this blog, I think this is for me more than anyone else. As cruise ends, I just wanted to reflect on the great experiences that happened while we were out to sea. I believe that Conrad’s quote perfectly sums up Sea Term: It is not easy; there are the hard days, the bad…
  If you see these hardworking cadets, please congratulate them for being the recipient of a Mater's Award.  These young men and women truly exemplify all that is Massachusetts Maritime Academy. An extra special shout out to the one-and-only Blogger Heather!  Your award is well-deserved!    
Sea Term 1946 “Someday those of us who have made the sea a career will appreciate those three months as among the best of our lives.” Sea Term 1953 “We arrived on the 22nd of April to find many of our folks waiting for us at Commonwealth Pier. Two days later the Chun returned to Buzzards Gulch, the throbbing engines dead, the rudders were stilled, and once again all reigned quiet and serene on Cape Cod Canal for the Middies were home again.” Sea Term 1958 “We had hoped for an easy and quick passage home, but once more Cape Hatteras was determined not to let us pass unscathed and threw the roughest water of the trip our way in the form of a left over gale.  The ship bulled her way…
  As cadets aboard the TS Kennedy are dreaming about their first home-cooked meal on Sunday, lets look at what cadets had to say about food in 1957, 1962, 1963, and 1975.   Sea Term 1957 “The Island of Trinidad popped over the horizon one morning and we found ourselves tying up at a dock at last, the Naval Air Station in the British West Indies. Almost as soon as the first line was ashore, Middies were racing towards the PX foe ice-cream.” Sea Term 1962 “Eating proved to be a bit of a problem on rolling seas as crockery, food, and midshipmen were scattered from one end of the Mess Deck to the other.”. Sea Term 1963 “The U.S. Naval Station in Trinidad was our last port of the…
BEFORE:   It’s one of the TS Kennedy’s dirtiest, smelliest, stomach-turning jobs - sorting food waste.  Oh, the job isn’t all bad.  You get to wear a super cool white, Tyvek coverall suit and work with Boson Tom Tucker, one of the friendliest, most supportive guys you could ever hope to meet.  And, if you’re lucky, you’ll be declared a hero if you discover a fork or a spoon in your colorful mound of meatloaf, breakfast cereal, apple cores, peas, pudding, bread crusts, and clam chowder.  As if that’s not enough, when you’re done, Boson Tom might treat you to a Slushie from the Crew Mess Deck.  Surely that makes the job worthwhile, right?  No, not really.  Although cadets…
3/C Mike Acampora’s Report: Evening Bridge Watch After coming to the Mess Deck following his nightly shift on Bridge Watch lasting from 1930 to 2330, 3/C Mike Acampora (MTRA) noted what he saw during this period. At this point in time, the TS Kennedy would be passing to the east of Cape Hatteras located alongside the Carolinas. As a result, the ship has had an increased pitch (movement upwards and downwards from bow to stern) with the onset of the larger waves and stronger winds that tend to be present here. At the present time, the ship is experiencing the 8-10 foot seas that are similar to those we had seen during our previous pass through this region. Cadet Acampora stated that he…